Say Cheese! Pablo’s Mini Cheese Tarts are at Bonifacio High Street, BGC

Pablo’s Mini Cheese Tarts
Bonifacio High Street, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City
(http://pablophilippines.com)
(https://www.facebook.com/PabloCheesetartPhilippines/)

I’ll be honest, and with the risk of you sending a look of bewilderment my way, I’ll say it: I’ve never heard of Pablo’s Mini Cheese Tarts, brought to the Philippines by the Suyen Corporation (yes, that’s the Bench group).  I guess in a way it made the experience of my first taste more authentic: I didn’t have any expectations whatsoever. 

The shop was named Pablo from Pablo Picasso, the artist.  The founder of Pablo, Masamitsu Sakimoto, said that just like how Pablo Picasso gave an element of surprise and excitement in his art, they also wish to do the same with their desserts.

So, it was a fateful day in Bonifacio High Street when I got a hold of these little morsels, which I now know are the cause of long, long, looong lines of customers patiently waiting for their own package of cheesy pleasure. I even read somewhere that when it first opened here in Manila, people had to wait in line for as long as four hours! Whaaat, parang pila sa UAAP Finals tickets lang?!

We were in a coffee shop on Boni High Street with family when one of my sisters-in-law brought in a box of these tarts. When I asked what they were, she said that these were really famous tarts from Japan which were making waves in the foodie scene of the Philippines, and then she invited me to try a piece. “Pinipilahan ito!”.  I was still so full from my coffee and pastry so I declined.  My brother-in-law was quick to add, “Pero mixed reviews ha.” He said that the Pablo’s tarts are often compared to other famous tarts and cheesecakes, and opinions vary on whether they are worth the hype, hassle and the price.

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Pero! After seeing my kids and the hubby devour these little, seemingly unassuming tarts, I went right out and bought two boxes of these little babies to take home.  Luckily, the line was short at that time since they run out and were still baking. No worries, I said. I had time and could come back when the tarts were ready 5 minutes later.

image1
One take-out box contains six mini tarts. I bought two to take home.
image2
Unboxing my takeaway box from Pablo’s.
So, I was able try it chilled from the ref instead of freshly baked. My verdict?

image3
cheesy and not “egg-y”
image5
soft and creamy tart
Mmmmmwwasharap nga! Cheesy and creamy and hindi nakakaumay. The pie crust can crumble and collapse if not handled gently, but the tart is not too soft that it gets gooey in your hands. The cheesy tart kinda melts in your mouth and coats your tongue with velvety goodness. But these are quite pricey, so I don’t think this will be my default purchase as a pasalubong every time.

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Pablo’s logo taken from their facebook
I do see myself getting in line at Pablo’s again and maybe trying their other products, as long as it’s just a few minutes wait and if I want a special treat. I’m just a little intrigued by the logo. Is that a J, B and T? Anyone know what that means?

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